Leslie Gordon

Leslie
Gordon
Articles
Why MIM makes sense for medical
For relatively small metal parts that are traditionally EDM’d, cast, or machined, medical OEMs might instead consider metal injection molding.
Why U.S manufacturing makes sense
When it comes to government support for medical- device manufacturing, do you ever get the feeling that nations such as Singapore are eating our lunch
‘Designershive’ blends injection molding and industrial design
For a peek into how an Asian medical-device firm might innovate, consider the example of Meiban in Singapore
Why U.S. manufacturing makes sense
Why would a company such as Australian-based Unilife, which manufactures the proprietary Unitract safety syringe, open its new multimillion-dollar global headquarters in York, PA, instead of, say, Singapore?
“Designershive” blends injection molding and industrial design
For a peek into how an Asian medical-device firm might innovate, consider the example of Meiban in Singapore.
Explicit-based modeling advances medical-device design
Software with what’s called an explicit-modeling approach lets device designers work directly with geometries on-the-fly without worrying about underlying constraints
Explicit-based modeling advances medical-device design 1
Software with what’s called an explicit-modeling approach lets device designers work directly with geometries on-the-fly without worrying about underlying constraints, parameters, and history trees that might otherwise hinder the creation of good-looking designs.
Rapid prototyping for orthopedics
The development of a new orthopedic device from drawing board to manufacturing typically takes months. Involving high-precision design work, and subject
China, player in the global market
China's current way of doing business is sometimes called capitalism with Chinese characteristics because companies there are now state or individually
The global stage: Medical manufacturing in China
The recent CMEF show seemed to indicate that China is a major player in the global medical-manufacturing market.
Putting the rapid into injection molding
Building prototypes with additive methods such as sterolithography and fused deposition modeling has been a hot topic lately and rightly so. But for parts
Custom and commodity cleanrooms and components
Since their invention in the 1960s for assembling delicate aerospace equipment, cleanrooms have become important tools in the medical industry. The enclosed
Prototypes for tools and for patients
Rapid prototyping in the form of both additive and subtractive technologies is being put to good use in operating rooms as well as design labs. For example,
Building strong yet lightweight hip implants
How often has one of your designs been a trade-off of weight versus strength? Too heavy, and you waste material. Too light, and parts might fail. Well,
Making IV components and filters
Few companies make all the parts that go into IV devices. Special adhesives might come from one firm, filters and media from another, and secondary operations

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